Bob Schroeder, Treasurer

Bob SchroederA 40-year resident of Juneau, Bob Schroeder’s professional work as an anthropologist has been focused on indigenous people in Alaska and subsistence hunting and fishing rights. He has witnessed the negative impacts of climate change on Alaska subsistence activities as well as on rural communities in India and Nepal where he conducted research. He, his wife and three children have lived on the fish and wildlife that the environment on Southeast Alaska has provided. Environmental justice informs his climate work and while he believes that climate change will affect everyone, Bob focuses his work on limiting the suffering of those most vulnerable to this ecological catastrophe.

Bob has a Ph.D. in cultural anthropology. Most of his work concerned how cultures use land and natural resources.  He is retired after 30 years working with state and federal agencies.

Elaine Schroeder, Co-Chair

A 36-year Juneau resident, Elaine Schroeder has been active in social Elaine Schroederand environmental issues for over 45 years, beginning in college opposing the Vietnam War before serving two years in India as a Peace Corps volunteer. She has a Ph.D. from the University of Washington and is now retired from her private practice as a psychotherapist. In addition to her work as 350Juneau co-chair, she volunteers for public radio and for several local arts organizations. Her greatest joys (aside from being with her husband, 3 kids, and 4 grandkids) are hiking in the Alaskan wilderness and cross-country skiing whenever and wherever there is snow.

Doug Woodby, Co-Chair

Doug WoodbyDoug Woodby began marine research in arctic Alaska in 1976 and began research on global warming in the 1980s as a graduate student. He served as Chief Fisheries Scientist for the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Commercial Fisheries Division until his retirement in 2012. While in that position he served 10 years on the North Pacific Fisheries Management Council’s Scientific and Statistical Committee and also on the North Pacific Research Board’s Science Panel where he helped guide funding for marine research, including research on climate change impacts.

Doug is married and has two adult sons. He has a BS from the University of Michigan, an MS from the University of Washington, plus a Masters in Statistics and a Doctorate in Biology from the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Heather Evoy

Heather EvoyHeather was born and raised in Ketchikan and is an Alaska Native, Tsimshian, and Tlingit. Heather graduated with a BLA from the University of Alaska Southeast with focus areas of Anthropology and Environmental Sciences and she began graduate studies in the fall of 2018, through the University of Alaska’s Northern Studies program. Some of Heather’s fondest childhood memories took place in Metlakatla with her grandmother when they went out in darkness at minus tides to dig for clams and when they would spend long summer hours together berry picking. She has taken notice of the many environmental changes experienced in her region, both in her personal life and academic work and seeks to understand those changes through an indigenous lens while strengthening and uniting forces for those most affected by the ongoing changes. She has lived in Juneau since 2012 where she, her husband, and two children have continued to enjoy being members of two intertribal dance groups and learning their Tsimshian ancestral language of S’malgyax.

Gretchen Keiser, Legislative Analyst

Gretchen KeiserGretchen is trained as a Biologist with a BS from Cornell University and MS from UAF. After a 40-year career in natural resources and land use planning in Alaska, she now focuses on climate action at the state level and renewable energy action in Juneau. Gretchen recharges her personal energy through frequent Juneau hikes, forging a garden despite the SE weather and critters, and self-guided, long kayaking adventures in southeast Alaska’s wild and wonderful marine waters. “We are blessed with an amazing environment here and have an obligation to work on solutions to address climate change.” Gretchen also serves on Juneau’s Commission on Sustainability.

Michael Tobin

Mike and PatMike was drawn to 350Juneau because of its emphasis on keeping fossil fuels in the ground and its work towards a fast, just transition to a renewable energy economy. He was an emergency medicine and family practice doctor in Oregon, Washington, California, and Alaska but before that, he was a sawmill worker in Oregon. He has also engaged in movements for farm worker rights, against the Vietnam War, and for universal health care. Mike and his partner, Patricia White, have enjoyed Alaska and many areas of western North America, on foot, by kayak, and by bike.

Suzanne Cohen. Volunteer Coordinator

Suzy CohenOriginally from Portland, Oregon, Suzi kicked off her Alaskan life working for the Forest Service in the Chugach National Forest at 18 years of age. After several summers working for the Forest Service, salmon canneries, and other odd jobs around the state, she traveled to Southeast Alaska. Walking into the Tongass Forest was an epiphany: she knew immediately, and without a doubt, that this would be her forever home. She has a bachelors from Evergreen State College in Olympia, WA and a Master’s of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine from the Oregon College of Oriental Medicine and has been practicing acupuncture in Juneau since 1992. She has raised two wonderful young sons and is happily married to Stuart Cohen, who shares her deep concerns about the environment and climate change.

Andy Romanoff

Andy Romanoff

From an early age, Andy he knew that he was destined to work for the betterment of the earth. After receiving a B.S. in Environmental Toxicology and Industrial Hygiene from Clarkson University he headed north to Alaska. He has worn many hats over three decades in the north, from community organizer to wilderness seakayak and river guide, from owner, captain and guide of a wildlife watching charter business to social worker, cook and most graphic designer. Environmental health has been a central pillar of Andy’s life, both personal and professional. The natural world fuels Andy’s passions for life, love and happiness and is the driving factor in nearly all of his decisions, endeavors, and interests. Andy is honored to be able to bring this passion and energy to 350Juneau, as a designer, organizer, and activist. What is Andy’s dream vision? An Alaskan capital city with only electric buses, few, if any oil-heated buildings, a primary focus on renewable energy and a community striving together to create a net-zero carbon footprint city.

 

Eileen Wagner

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Sonia Nagorski

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